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Sorry, no manpages available for db_open.

today trying to find a manual page for db_open function of BerkeleyDB in Google gave me sort of surprise -- first 6 links were broken! that's a bit unusual -- often you get one or more broken page, but six in a row is some kind of anomaly. first working link was on Oracle site, so I wonder -- was it Oracle pulling BDB docs from other sites? 

so here's what Google returned to me:

Berkeley DB: db_open The db_open function opens the database represented by file for both reading and writing. ... Also, calling db_open is a reasonably expensive operation. ... pegasus.cs.csubak.edu/docs/berkeley_debugger/api_c/Db/open.html

site fails to open 

Проект OpenNet: MAN db_open (3) Библиотечные вызовы (FreeBSD и Linux) db_open (3). Руководство не найдено. - 1. Команды и прикладные программы пользовательского уровня, русские | linux | freebsd | solaris | разные | posix ... www.opennet.ru/cgi-bin/opennet/man.cgi?topic=db_open&category=3

text says manual not found -- but why is there a link on it?

UNIX man pages : db_open (3) www.nsc.ru/cgi-bin/www/unix_help/unix-man?db_open+3

blank page..

SGI TPL View (3 db_open) Unable to find a manual page for: db_open. home/search | what's new | help techpubs.sgi.com/library/tpl/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?cmd=getdoc&coll=0650&db ...3%20db_open

DragonFly On-Line Manual Pages : db_open(3) DragonFly On-Line Manual Pages. Manual page could not be found, please try again. leaf.dragonflybsd.org/cgi/web-man?command=db_open&section=3

Index to db_open manpages. Index to db_open manpages. Sorry, no manpages available for db_open. www-linux.gsi.de/cgi-bin/man2html?db_open+3

Berkeley DB: DB->open Berkeley DB: An embedded database programmatic toolkit. www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/berkeley-db/db/api_c/db_ open.html

that's where i've found it..

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